Iranian Women Are Showing Off Their Hair As An Act Of Protest And It Is A Very Big Deal

1. This is Masih Alinejad, an Iranian journalist who is an advocate and activist for religious freedom and women’s rights. 2. Since 1979, all women in Iran ...
publicado por
Buzz Feed avatar photo
hace karma
0,40

1. This is Masih Alinejad, an Iranian journalist who is an advocate and activist for religious freedom and women’s rights.

This is Masih Alinejad, an Iranian journalist who is an advocate and activist for religious freedom and women's rights.

2. Since 1979, all women in Iran are required to cover their hair in public.

Since 1979, all women in Iran are required to cover their hair in public.

In 2014, approximately 3.6 million women in Iran were warned, fined, or arrested by the morality police for inappropriate dress, according to Esmail Ahmadi-Maghaddam, Head of the national security forces in Iran.

3. Growing up in Iran, Masih saw her older brother as a symbol of the freedom she did not have.

Growing up in Iran, Masih saw her older brother as a symbol of the freedom she did not have.

“How he was free to run in a green, lovely farm without head scarf.”

4. Today, she is constantly impressed by the diversity and freedom she sees around her, living in the United States.

Today, she is constantly impressed by the diversity and freedom she sees around her, living in the United States.

“I love that! Two women with head scarves, and two women without head scarves. Look at how they are free! They just, you know, walk past each other without judging each other. Without getting arrested by the morality police. Isn’t that beautiful?”

5. Masih started to post photos of herself with and without her hijab on Facebook. Soon, others started to send her their own photos.

Masih started to post photos of herself with and without her hijab on Facebook. Soon, others started to send her their own photos.

6. Inspired, Masih began the Facebook group, My Stealthy Freedom. With over 803,000 followers, the page has become a site of quiet and courageous protest.

Inspired, Masih began the Facebook group, My Stealthy Freedom. With over 803,000 followers, the page has become a site of quiet and courageous protest.

7. A woman showing her hair is still a punishable crime in Iran.

A woman showing her hair is still a punishable crime in Iran.

8. Still, thousands of women and girls bravely stand up for freedom, and support each other.

Still, thousands of women and girls bravely stand up for freedom, and support each other.

9. Even many women who choose to cover their heads for religious reasons, support freedom of choice over the compulsory Hijab.

Even many women who choose to cover their heads for religious reasons, support freedom of choice over the compulsory Hijab.

10. Masih points out that there are also many photos of Iranian men who support the movement.

Vox / Via youtube.com

 

11. Many of the messages she receives from young Iranian women express their desire to “feel the wind through their hair. It’s a simple demand.”

Many of the messages she receives from young Iranian women express their desire to "feel the wind through their hair. It's a simple demand."

Unfortunately, Masih adds, “To be like this is forbidden in Iran.”

12. “Iran is for all Iranians. Iran is me and my mother. My mother wants to wear a scarf. I don’t want to wear a scarf. Iran should be for both of us.”

"Iran is for all Iranians. Iran is me and my mother. My mother wants to wear a scarf. I don't want to wear a scarf. Iran should be for both of us."

13. Learn more about My Stealthy Freedom, and watch the entire video here:

Cortesía de: BuzzFeed